Radiometric age dating calculator

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Here is one example of an isochron, based on measurements of basaltic meteorites (in this case the resulting date is 4.4 billion years) [Basaltic1981, pg. Skeptics of old-earth geology make great hay of these examples.

For example, creationist writer Henry Morris [Morris2000, pg.

Scientists look at half-life decay rates of radioactive isotopes to estimate when a particular atom might decay.

A useful application of half-lives is radioactive dating.

This has to do with figuring out the age of ancient things.

If you could watch a single atom of a radioactive isotope, U-238, for example, you wouldn’t be able to predict when that particular atom might decay.

For example, an object with a quarter of its original amount (2x1/2) should be roughly 11,460 years old.

Dating schemes based on rates of radioactivity have been refined and scrutinized for several decades.If there is too much daughter product(in this case nitrogen-14), age is hard to determine since the half-life does not make up a significant percentage of the material's age.The range of practical use for carbon-14 dating is roughly a few hundred years to fifty thousand years.In radiometric dating, the decaying matter is called the parent isotope and the stable outcome of the decay is called the daughter product.Since the half-life of carbon-14 is 5730 years, scientists can measure the age of a sample by determining how many times its original carbon-14 amount has been cut in half since the death of the organism.

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